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TIPS FOR WINNING BASKETBALL

 

SHOOTING


In an online shooting discussion, Zachary Boisvert made these excellent points:

"Try teaching shooting in word pictures. Sit with your staff and come up with12-15-20 terms pertaining to shooting and those are what your players should be hearing.

A couple of things about these word pictures:
1. Phrased in the positive, not negative ("hold your follow through" rather than "don't drop your hands")
2. Paint a picture (maybe it's saying "pose the follow through" instead of "hold your follow through"
3. Brevity is key (once the point about the importance of "posing" your follow through is made, simply saying "pose it" could be more effective than "pose the follow though". Why? It's quicker + you're not nagging, (you're not asking them to do it, you're reminding them of a standard theyre striving for).

The key is that these word pictures are consistent throughout your program. He's not hearing 1 thing from 1 coach, and hearing different things from the others. There are 10-15 phrases that you've settled on and that's what your guys are hearing."

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Some thoughts that may help you guide your players in
team shooting:
* Get a shot that WE want!
* When defense is set, ball must change side of the floor
before a shot, unless a lay-up.
* Does your best shooter have a "green light"? Is he good
enough for it? The good shooter often shoots better when
his mind is not clogged with "should I shoot."
* When a player takes a bad shot, stop play and ask the
team, "How many of you thought that was a good shot."
Peer pressure is one of the key coaching tools.
* Late in a close game, have a "Great Shot Offense" to
go to.
* Regardless of shooting ability, the backboard must be
covered.
* The great shooter must learn to put the ball on the floor.
* Most open player for a shot is usually your best screener.
* You don't take "turns" shooting. Your better shooters do
the shooting. Dictate who they will be.
* A drive will often be better than a shot because you help
get the opponent into foul trouble.

 

THE 3-POINT SHOT


As a coach analyzes how much he will shoot the 3-point shot,
he should keep the following statistic in mind: 33% SHOOTING
FROM 3-POINT RANGE IS THE SAME AS 50%SHOOTING
FROM 2-POINT RANGE.

    Another statistic that is important involves offensive rebounding
The 3-point shot increases a team’s opportunities for the
offensive rebound simply because the 3-point shot attempt
tends to rebound longer than 2-point attempts. This can result in
deceiving statistics as far as shooting percentage is concerned.

WHEN WILL THE 3 POINT SHOT BE TAKEN?

     Will the shot be taken on the fast-break? Will the shot be
taken early in the set offense, or will it be taken after working
the ball in an effort to get it inside? Will special plays be run
to get the 3-point shot or will the shot be taken only from a
team’s normal set offense?
     A very important decision is whether or not the shot will be
taken on the fast-break. Will players be allowed to take the
3-pointer when they outnumber the defense on a fast-break?
     These decisions must be made by the Head Coach and conveyed
clearly to the team. Any player attempting the 3-point shot must
feel comfortable when shooting it and not have to worry whether
or not the coach wants him to shoot it.

INSIDE-OUT OFFENSE

  In this day of the love affair with the 3 point shot, it is even more important for a coach to teach the value of the inside game. Many teams are sliding away from the "inside-out" tactic and are content with an excessive amount of 3 point attempts.

The most important advantages of the inside game are:
(1) You get the higher percentage shot.
(2) The defense is forced to defend the lane, which opens up better outside shot opportunities; in fact, the best time to shoot the "three" is after the ball is passed back out from inside.
(3) A player shooting an inside shot is fouled more often than a player shooting an outside shot; thus, you create more free throw opportunities and get your opponent into foul trouble
.

PASSING

Do not underestimate the value of the player taking the ball out-of-bounds. That player MUST be one of your best passers (if not the best). This is particularly true when you have the ball out in a close game late in the game. If the defense is down, they will use every tactic to deny the ball from coming inbounds. I have seen many teams lose a game because they did not have a good passer taking the ball out-of-bounds. In addition to having a good passer take the ball out, be sure to practice getting the ball inbounds against pressure several times a week. If at all possible, make the inbounds pass to a good free throw shooter if you anticipate being fouled on purpose.